Linn Records


Linn Records is based in Glasgow, Scotland, and has offerings in classical, jazz, and Scottish music. The company also manufactures audio equipment. 

Some time ago, we purchased two Linn Records CD's.  One was a recording of Antonin Dvoř├ík's Piano Quintet in A and String Quartet in F "American" by the Schidlof Quartet.  The other was an early music CD entitled Airs de Cour, featuring the talents of Catherine King, Jacob Heringman, and Charles Daniels (not Charlie Daniels, though he is also a talented musician).  I was more than satisfied with the quality of both CD's, and consider them excellent values; great music, wonderfully recorded.  The booklet that came with Airs de Cour was well-done and highly informative.

The company maintains a website at www.linnrecords.com, with a separate website for audio equipment at www.linn.co.uk. The first of the two sites has a Download section, where one can purchase and download selections in either "Studio Master" quality or CD or MP3 quality.

Let's take an example of how all this works, and say that we're interested in purchasing (in one form or another), the Irish Baroque Orchestra's Concerti Bizarri album. (Because, among other things, such a recording would fill a hole in our collection, where we find that we are currently without any recordings of the Irish Baroque Orchestra and without, as far as we know, any recordings of concerti known principally for their bizarreness, as would seem to be the implied case here.) Linn helpfully informs us that, "This programme of 18th century concertos is an attractive listening tour through the German courts, revealing unknown jewels."

We could, simply, purchase the physical compact disc from Linn, at a cost of $20. (All costs are as advertised on July 25, 2016.)

As an alternative, we could download the album (downloads include cover art and booklet, which is much appreciated) in a number of different formats, at differing prices.

Studio Master downloads are available in either FLAC or ALAC formats (briefly discussed on our Classical Music and the iPod page), with either format further available in either 24bit 192kHz or 24bit 96kHz. Whichever you choose, the cost will be $24, so we're not quite sure why you'd go with the 96kHz, though admittedly the files are smaller. Perhaps you are one of those persons who believes that any improvement above 96kHz is undetectable by humans, a digression we'll avoid here.

You could also opt for the less pristine CD quality download in either FLAC or ALAC, which is 16bit and only 44.1kHz, and which costs $13.

Finally, if you only have $11 to spend, you can download the album in MP3 format which is, of course, 320k and 44.1kHz.

If you're in the United States and wondering whether these are your only options, the answer is yes and no. You could go to Amazon and get the MP3 download for $8.99. Or, you could purchase the physical compact disc from Amazon for $20.21. Depending upon what Linn charges for shipping, this may or may not be the less expensive way to go.

You cannot get the Studio Master download from anyone but Linn, as far as we know, and if we really wanted this album, that's probably what we'd choose - because, after all, if you're going to listen to music, you may as well do so in as optimal a manner as possible.

 

 



 

 

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